Collins v. Colbert: May the Most Prepared Win

Next time you’re at a cocktail party and someone asks you “where do you work?” make sure you have a great answer—a memorable message about what your work means to me.

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War and PowerPoint

In a cleverly named piece ("We Have Met the Enemy and He Is PowerPoint"), Elisabeth Bumiller looks at the now infamous PowerPoint diagram of the United States' strategy in Afghanistan and the strong feelings about PowerPoint among the officers leading efforts abroad.

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In Kenya, a New Media Generation

While many in Kenya still lack access to electricity, a vibrant blogging and social networking scene is emerging from Nairobi.

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A Discussion with National Health Information Technology Coordinator David Blumenthal

“We have to start seeing health information systems as a mainstream technology that is part and parcel of medical practice, not something that is appended to it as an afterthought, not something that’s imposed on it, but something that will very soon be integrated into it and indistinguishable from all the other work that physicians and other health professionals do every day.”

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Making Gene Patents Work for Patients

Two decades ago, the controversial decision to allow patents on human genes sparked a genetic gold rush. Corporations and universities rushed to file a flurry of claims on genes linked to specific diseases like breast cancer and Alzheimer's. Since then, the patents themselves have invited plenty of criticism, but recently it’s the exclusive licenses often granted to companies developing diagnostics tests that have come under fire as anticompetitive – and damaging to patient care.

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A New Roadmap for Agricultural Research

“Today, 1.4 billion people around the world live in extreme poverty. Many of them are women and children. Most of them are farmers.” That’s World Bank President Robert Zoellick in a video address to the Global Conference on Agricultural Research for Development (GCARD), an unprecedented gathering in Montpellier, France that brought together researchers, policymakers, farmers, donors, and members of civil society from every region of the world.

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SXSW 2010: CrisisCamp, Haiti, and Saving Lives with Technology

When a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti on January 12, the call went out across the globe for relief to save lives in the impoverished Caribbean nation. For a group of technology pioneers in the U.S., that meant one thing: software. With skill, an understanding of the situation on the ground and a willing crowd of contributors, a networked few can make real impact – even from thousands of miles away.

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A National Epidemic—and a Presidential Priority

Our nation is burdening Americans needlessly with disease— Americans who could be healthy if we tackled the factors that cause obesity: neighborhoods without spaces for physical activity, deficient access to healthy foods, high-calorie school lunches. It’s for this reason that the 42nd President called childhood obesity the “number one public health problem in the country”.

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Make Facebook, Not War…

The new “social media revolution” seems to have hit parents in the same way that the “sexual revolution” hit parents in the 60s and 70s—we don’t always understand it.

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SXSW 2010: Spot.us and the Future of Accountability Reporting

“There’s no silver bullet” to fix the decline of investigative reporting, says David Cohn. But the founder of Spot.us may be offering a bridge for journalism by handing editorial direction to the public.

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