Barracuda’s Revenge

The threat from a barracuda’s ugly, sharp-toothed grimace is enough to make divers quake in their flippers. But danger lurks even after the reef fish is hooked and cooked up for a meal. Barracuda and other popular sport fish including grouper, amberjack and hogfish are a source of ciguatera poisoning—the most common form of fish-related food poisoning in the world and is sickening many more people in Florida than previously reported.

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A Win for the Affordable Care Act

There was a great deal of exuberance in the hallways at Burness yesterday when the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) subsidies for people living in states with federally run health insurance marketplaces—and I know we weren’t alone.

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What Will Stop the Rising Trend of Obesity in America?

Imagine the challenge for the millions of parents who live without access to healthy, affordable foods or in neighborhoods where it’s not safe for their kids to play outside. Consider that U.S. food and beverage companies spend nearly $2 billion each year targeting kids with ads, apps and websites promoting junk foods, sugary drinks and other unhealthy fare. How do we turn the tide?

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The Pope’s Climate Change Role Models

The Pope’s environment and climate change encyclical exploded on the scene this week, unleashing debate about humanity’s relationship to the planet. While the document, entitled Laudato Si, was generally critical of the way people have treated the planet, it praised one group for its respect for the earth: indigenous people.

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Online Tool Aims to Bring Bounty Harvest in Kenya

If you are a farmer living in Embu County, Kenya, how do you know which seed to plant? Maybe you decide based on what your neighbors plant or what you’ve always planted. But over the last 10 years, plant breeders in Kenya have likely developed new varieties of seeds with specific traits that could thrive on your farm and give you higher yields.

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School Is Out For Summer

Across the country, kids (and parents!) are celebrating the end of the school year. But should it be a break from learning? No. The so-called "summer slide" is real. Students typically lose two to three months in reading achievement and two months of math skills during the summer.

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Agriculture and the Africa Rising Narrative

Africa is the next frontier of the global economy. Several African countries boast some of the fastest growth rates in the world. Four of the world’s top 10 fastest growing economies in 2015 and 2016 are forecasted to be in Africa. And yet, the sector that employs as much as 60 percent of Africa’s labor force only accounts for 25 percent of the gross domestic product. Why the disconnect?

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Burness Has a Ball with Playworks

Last week, Burness joined Playworks D.C. in their Fifth Annual Corporate Kickball Tournament, a fundraiser supporting local schools. Playworks is a national organization using the power of play to equip children with the social and emotional skills needed to succeed in life.

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In Bonn, Forest Peoples Share Their Stories

Indigenous leaders from Africa, Asia and the Americas came together in Bonn to share their experiences at the frontlines of an often deadly battle to guard tropical forests. A recent report suggests these conflicts kill at least two people every week.

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Is Summer a Bummer for Kids’ Health?

It’s June, and that means school is letting out for millions of kids – but according to a new brief from Active Living Research, those of us who associate summer vacation with healthy activities are out of touch with the reality of summer break for today’s children. Recent research shows that children gain up to three times as much weight during summer break as they do during the entire school year.

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